How To Use this Site

All relevant information about using the site  can be found above on the Black Bar, as well as all available minutes,  and the complete Bylaws with Amendments. Click on the appropriate heading to access them. -admin-

You can access past posts, including Co-op News, as well as news in the world about organic gardening, GMO discussions, farming, recipes, and more….

Simply go to the right hand column and find “Categories”.  Click on the arrow and scroll to your topic.

Posted in About Co-op, Board News, News from the Co-op | Comments Off

School Garden Help Needed

School Garden Help

 

School Garden

Calling all Amazing Co-op Members! Help support the School Garden project by participating in a work party to get things cleaned up from the school year. Also, we just received 6 new garden bed frames that need to be filled with dirt! Call or email Jen to let her know if you can help to support the school garden. Let’s show the community what cooperation is all about!

 

Posted in About Co-op, Co-op Newsletter and Weekly Articles, Event Calendar, Info for Volunteers | Leave a comment

Restocking & Cleaning Help at the Coop

 

Inventory

Great news! The Real Food Co-op is getting busy, but this means we need some help, too. Cashiers often do not have time to restock produce and other items or do the dishes, clean up a spill, etc. Stop by anytime for 15 minutes or more to help out.  Just a few minutes from a handful of people makes a HUGE difference! Consider contributing 15 minutes before your own shopping time. Let’s cooperate to make our store a success…thats what we are all about!

Keep track of your time to earn a working member discount. Discounts begin at 3 hours of work (5% discount earned the following month) and increase up to 9 hours (6 hours = 10% and 9 hours = 15%).

If you have questions or would like more info, email the store.

Posted in About Co-op, Co-op Newsletter and Weekly Articles, Community/Member Support, Info for Volunteers, News from the Co-op | Leave a comment

Cashier Openings This Week

 

Hello Members,

I just got back  from another quarterly inventory.  Such fun and we missed you…

Please note we will be closing at 2pm on July 4th.

There are plenty of openings this week.  Help yourself.

Monday, June 29                   10a-12p; 12p-3p; 3p-6p

Tuesday, June 30                  12p-3p; 2p-6p

Wednesday, July 1                10a-12p; 3p-6p

Thursday, July 2                    10a-12p; 12p-3p; 3p-6p

Friday, July 3                         10a-12p; 3p-6p

Saturday, July 4                     10a-12p; 12p-2p

Thanks for any help you can give,

Rene

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Real Food Co-op Now Hiring!

Natural Foods Co-op, Florence Oregon

The Real Food Co-op store Manager,  Jen Nelson, has been at the helm since the inception of the Co-op on Rhododendron Drive.  She will be missed by all of us, and will probably be hard to replace. However, we are putting out a call to all of you who may be interested to apply for this position.

The Real Food Co-op Store Manager is responsible for operating the store in a manner that promotes the Co-op’s mission statement, and is responsible for selecting vendors, purchasing products, accepting deliveries, paying bills, and generally ensuring that the store supports the needs of its customers and the community at large.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities and Delegation include but are not limited to the following:

  1. Seek out and develop new vendors, and manage and maintain existing vendor relationships.
  2. Order merchandise as needed to maintain inventory on shelves and in stockroom.  Place special orders as requested by customers. May recommend additions to or deletions of merchandise stocked in store.
  3. Inspect merchandise upon delivery, record delivery, verify receipt of ordered items, arrange for merchandise return if necessary.
  4. Pay bills related to merchandise delivery and store operations
  5. Sort and distribute mail.
  6. Make or arrange for daily bank deposits to be made.
  7. Interview and select consignment vendors, manage consignment inventory levels, and make payments in accordance with terms agreed to by Store Manager and vendor.
  8. Ensure that the merchandise is correctly priced and displayed.
  9. Ensure that a store-wide inventory of merchandise and non-merchandise is conducted on a regular basis and reports are provided to Co-op Treasurer or other appropriate parties.
  10. Responsible for  Community Outreach and Education
  11. Attend Board of Directors meetings monthly and give a Manager’s Report of the status of the Co-op.

Other duties may be assigned.

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities:

The Co-op Store Manager should be knowledgeable about current organic food products and industry trends in organic foods and natural products, and should  have experience or knowledge of best practices and overall retail store duties.  These include marketing, but are not limited to those listed above.

This is an opportunity to be a part of an amazing coastal community and local food sustainability movement.

Please send your resume and cover letter explaining what you want us to know about you and your experience relating to this job position and why we should hire you.

Contact us at:

Ph:  541 997 3396        or email: realfoodcoop2@gmail.com

 

 

Posted in About Co-op, Board News, Co-op Newsletter and Weekly Articles, Jen's Corner, News from the Co-op, Special Interest | Leave a comment

June Newsletter from Your Co-op

A Letter from Jen Nelson, General Manager

General Manager Jen Nelson

May 26, 2015

 

With mixed feelings I am submitting my Letter of Resignation today. I am willing and able to give the co-op 4-6 weeks before I leave, allowing for us to hire and train the perfect person for the manager’s position.

 

I give thanks for my opportunity to work at the co-op…..to learn what I have learned and meet the people that I have met. I plan to continue donating my time to arrange the community education classes and other community outreach opportunities, maintain the garden, and will join the Board later this year.

 

Thanks and I love you all!

 

Jen

Editors note: Jen will be at the co-op for the next several weeks; stop in to wish her well. We will miss her enthusiasm, friendly spirit and many talents and we wish her all the best!

Call to Artists and Art Enthusiasts!

Silent Art Auction Poster

A silent auction to benefit the Real Food Co-op will be heldSaturday, June 27, 6:00 PM at the Kenneth B. Gallery. Come join the fun, including a drum circle (bring an instrument to join in), Bollywood Dance with Eileen Angilletta, and live band, Speaker Wave. Doors open at 6:00 PM ($5).

 

Additionally, we are looking for art and craft donations to be auctioned off at this fundraiser. Proceeds benefit our co-op. This is a great way to help support the Real Food Co-op! All pieces need to be received by June 20.

 

If you are interested in donating, would like to help with the event, or have questions, please contact Community Outreach & Fundraising coordinator, Christine Delgado, via email or phone: 206-369-6825.

Roots & Shoots 
~ elsan

Festive Fiddleheads

 

Warm Fiddlehead Salad
Warm Fiddlehead Salad (click photo for link to recipe).

We’re on the east coast visiting our daughter. Coastal Maine. About a week after arriving in this scenic coastal village, signs popped up at the grocery store, food co-op, farmers markets and farm stands announcing the arrival of fiddleheads.

 

They’re Here ~ Fiddleheads Are In! Hand-drawn green spirals on another sign, simply announced, They’re In!

Along the road an elderly woman sat on a lawn chair with an open hatchback of her Subaru filled with baskets of dark green spirals. Two well-placed signs on the road in both directions clearly stated, Clean Fiddleheads. She’s there every year.

 

Gathering, preparing and serving fiddleheads are a big deal here. A festival. A Maine tradition. Mainers are closely aligned to seasons. Whether at work or play their lives are shaped by the seasonal changes. Everything harvested here has its season ~ gathering and eating fiddleheads is one important marker closing the gate on winter.

 

I’ve had fiddleheads before but never with such a festive feeling ~ a meal with a bowl of steamed fiddleheads heralds in another season. To witness the excitement and urgency of harvesting, preparing and eating fiddleheads is a treat. It’s a short season for these little green wonders so there’s no time to waste.

 

For certain, fiddleheads are a Maine delicacy. A singing shade of green ~ known as fiddlehead green ~ to Maine people is what you will find along certain riverbanks and streams during the month of May, writes Marjorie Standish in her cookbook, Cooking Down East.

Most ferns have fiddleheads but only the ostrich fern,Matteuccia struthiopteris, is the edible fiddlehead so eagerly hunted and harvested. (Editor’s Note: It is important that you harvest only edible types of fiddleheads; others may be toxic. If you are unfamiliar with fiddleheads, it is best to take a class before harvesting them on your own or to purchase them from a reputable dealer/store. When in season, fiddleheads are available at the Real Food Co-op.)

 

Taste? Well, sort of a grassy, spring-like nutty flavor. Some liken them to a cross between asparagus and young spinach with a hint of artichoke and mushroom. Nutritionally, they are a good source of fiber, Vitamins A and C and Omega-3 fatty acids.

 

When fiddleheads first push through the ground they’re covered with a thin, brown membrane. As the bright green, coiled heads grow the membrane breaks into flakes. Best when they’re about 1-1 ½ inches. Larger is okay if tightly coiled. Fiddleheads grow along the banks of brooks, streams and rivers in clusters of 3-12. Those who harvest their own fiddleheads never reveal their secret gardens.

 

Fiddlehead Carbonara
Fiddlehead Carbonara (click photo for link to recipe).

Proper preparation and cooking are critical. Wash several times to remove dirt, grit and brown flecks. Adequate cooking is important. Steam or boil washed fiddleheads about 10 – 12 minutes. Longer cooking will turn them slimy.

 

Fiddleheads should not be eaten lightly cooked and especially not raw. According to the Maine Cooperative Extension they can carry a food-borne illness or cause stomach upset in some people. Cooking neutralizes the specific compound that can cause gastric distress.

 

There are a few recipes using fiddleheads such as in a lemon risotto, veggie pasta or pickling. But the favorite and most popular way to enjoy fiddleheads is simply steamed or boiled, served plain with butter, pepper and salt. It’s the best way to appreciate their delicate flavor.

Now Hiring

 

Co-op with New Sign

Real Food Co-op is hiring a new General Manager! If you love working with your community, local food producers and farmers, and supporting local food sustainability, this job may be for you! This is a part time position of approximately 25 hours per week. Bring your resume into the co-op.

Rhody Days Parade a Success!

 

Thanks to those who participated in the Rhody Days Parade! We had a great time and educated the community as to what we are about.

 

Thanks to everyone who participated!

 

Rhody Parade 2015
Rhody Parade 2015
Rhody Parade 2015
Rhody Parade 2015

 

 

Upcoming Presentations

Co-op presentations have been popular events where co-op members and customers have free access to excellent information. Be sure to check out upcoming events in June (all are open to the public):

 

Growing Food in Florence

Saturday, June 6, 3:00 PM

 

Starts broccoli and kohlrabi

Join us at Real Food Co-op to learn more about growing food in our unique area.  Many folks find the wind, sandy soil, and cooler temperatures difficult for growing food. Talk with local organic gardeners to get ideas about how to make your garden grow!

 

You will have an opportunity to tour the garden in front of the co-op. This garden provides an opportunity for folks to see that you can produce food in a small garden in Florence.

 

Learn organic methods of dealing with pests like slugs, snails, cabbage moths, and aphids. There also are many types of organic fertilizers and soil amendments that are available in Florence; you can ask our gardeners about them.

 

Come with your gardening questions!

 

 

 

Get Involved!

 

There are many ways to get involved in the co-op…attend an event, volunteer, or support our community:


Quarterly Inventory

Sunday, June 28

10:00 AM

Taking inventory

It’s time again for our quarterly inventory. Many hands make light work…the more that come to help, the sooner we will be finished. Volunteers earn store discounts for the following month. Email Jen for info.

 

Store-front Garden


We are looking for a person or people who would like to create a demonstration food-production garden in our store-front plot. It wouldn’t take much time and it would be a great way to demonstrate to our community how easy it is to grow food in Florence. Email Jen for info.

Harvest Recipes

 

Looking for some great recipes to enjoy the bountiful harvest coming into the co-op this time of year?

 

Kale Quinoa and Avocado Salad
Kale, Quinoa, & Avocado Salad (click photo for link to recipe).

Kale recipes from allrecipes.com

 

Strawberry recipes from foodnetwork.com

 

Nectarine recipes from huffingtonpost.com

 

Grape recipes from eatingwell.com

 

Rhubarb recipes from allrecipes.com

 

Mustard greens recipes from simplyrecipes.com

At the Store Right Now…

 

Local: kale (many varieties), spinach, chard, summer squash, strawberries, rhubarb, mustard, lettuce.

 

Fruit is here, too! We are getting cherries, peaches, nectarines, and grapes from California now!

 

Come in and check it out!

 

Check the produce price list to see what is grown regionally!

Needs for the Store!

 

Contact the store if you are able and interested in helping with any of the following. Members who help or who donate items earn store discounts!

  • White-out tape
  • Scissors
  • Mr. Clean eraser sponges
  • Bookshelf (12″ deep) needs to be to mounted on wall over the snack shelf
  • Kombucha stand…something to set the small kegeratoron
  • We are interested in purchasing a small cart (similar to the ones at the library). Cost is $148. Looking for people willing to donate toward this effort.
  • Black sharpies
  • Mortar and pestle for folks to grind their herbs
  • Paper towels and toilet paper…from recycled materials
  • Small bowls

Thanks to all of our members who help keep our store running and prices low!

Photos from May Canning Presentation

 

Those attending our May canning presentation found it both informative and enjoyable!

 

Canning Demonstration

Canning Demonstration

Working Member Opportunities & Store Discounts

 

Working Members are what makes our co-op a CO-OP!

 

Here are some fun and amazing opportunities for our members to help make a difference at our co-op. Remember…the more folks that donate their time the more successful our co-op is. Here are some ideas, but feel free to let us know how you can help your co-op.

  • Dust Devils-help keep our store clean!
  • Produce Patsy’s-arrange produce to make it look beautiful, help restock as needed or be there when the order arrives to help put it away
  • Herb  Head-alphabetize our herb stock and help prepare our bi-monthly orders
  • Order Receivers-be there when orders arrive and help price and stock them.
  • Candy Colonel-organize our candy and snacks, help us research other healthy snacks that we can carry in our store
  • Seaweed Siren-order from our seaweed provider as needed
  • Consignment Queen-help us display our consignment items and keep track of sales; you also will help decide what we carry on consignment

All of these positions have flexible scheduling and are eligible for the working member discount.

 

Remember, if you donate 3 hours in one month, you get an additional 5% off your member prices on groceries for the entire next month!  For 6 hours you receive 10% off and for 9 hours you receive 15% off…and you are part of an amazing Co-op Community!

Posted in About Co-op, Co-op Newsletter and Weekly Articles, Community/Member Support, Event Calendar, Garden Tips, Jen's Corner, News from the Co-op, Organic products, Recipes, Special Interest, Upcoming Events | Leave a comment

Upcoming Events at the Co-op

We have a number of wonderful events being held at the Real Food Co-op this month. All events are open to the public.

NextStep Recycling       May 23-30

This is a great opportunity to clean your house of old electronics that you no longer need and to ensure they do not end up in a landfill.

Recycle almost anything electronic at our upcoming NextStep Recycling event! Just about anything that plugs in or runs on batteries will be accepted.

Donation bins will be placed outside the store for easy drop off.

NOTE: We do NOT recommend leaving any computer equipment or similar devices that contain personal information since the drop location is not secure.

More information about NextStep Recycling is available at their website.

 

Clean Your House Naturally     Saturday, May 23 at 3:00 PM

Making natural cleaners at home not only saves you money but is better for our environment. We are commonly exposed to toxins on a daily basis from many of the cleaners that are on the market. The cleaners that you make at can be used on a regular basis without exposing ourselves, our loved ones or pets to toxic chemicals.

Join member Frances Klippel as she teach us how to make natural cleaners at home with common household items. They are easy to make using vinegars, essential oils, and other basic items. Frances also will talk about using soap nuts for cleaning and laundry. What is a soap nut you ask? Come on by and find out!

Please join us for this great class!

 

Local Farmers Market to Open     

Sunday, May 24 from 10:00 to 2:00

The weekly Local Farmers Market begins this weekend, on May 24, from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM in the Pro Lumber parking lot. Hope to see you there!

 

Call To Artists    Deadline: June 20

We are looking for art and craft donations for a fundraiser for the co-op. The benefit will be held June 27 at the Kenneth B Gallery. All pieces need to be received by June 20.

If you are interested in donating, would like to help with the event, or have questions, please contact Community Outreach & Fundraising coordinator, Christine Delgado, via email or phone: 206-369-6825.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in About Co-op, Event Calendar, Jen's Corner, News from the Co-op, recycling, Special Interest, Upcoming Events | Leave a comment

Happenings at Real Food Co-op

It’s hard to believe May is already here! We have a lot of exciting things lined up this month. Be sure to read the entire newsletter to learn about upcoming events and opportunities at the Real Food Co-op!

We hope you enjoy this issue of our monthly newsletter!

Sincerely,

Real Food Co-op

541-997-3396

_____________________________________________________________

 

Real Food Co-op Receives Green Award!

The co-op was recently acknowledged by the City of Florence for our efforts to make our community more green!

We are proud that our efforts to recycle, reuse, and reduce the waste that we create have been recognized. We not only recycle paper, boxes, and glass, but also plastic wrap and other packaging materials that we receive. We have dedicated co-op members that take our compost and wash our towels. Local farms reuse boxes and berry containers. We also purchase in bulk, reducing the amount of waste that comes with our food; for example, a case of canned beans comes with a box, plastic wrap, 12 cans, and 12 paper labels. A 25 lb. bag of beans comes in one paper bag. It’s that simple!

The co-op creates approximately one 13 gallon bag of garbage per week! Isn’t that amazing? This is because of the commitment that our members have to our environment and our community!

Thank you!

_____________________________________________________________

Call to Artists!

We are looking for art and craft donations for a fundraiser for the co-op. The benefit will be held June 27 at the Kenneth B Gallery.

All pieces need to be received by June 20.

If you are interested in donating, would like to help with the event, or have questions, please contact Community Outreach & Fundraising coordinator, Christine Delgado, via email or phone: 206-369-6825.

____________________________________________________________

Roots & Shoots  ~  elsan

Ginger ~ Gem of the Spices

Zingiberaceae is a family with a spicy reputation. Often referred to as the ginger family, it comprises about 1300 cousins including the powerful spices, ginger and turmeric. Zingiber comes from a Sanskrit word meaning horn-shaped, referring to the rhizomes.

Ginger, the most widely used spice worldwide, is valued for its aromatic, culinary and medicinal purposes. For over 5,000 years it’s been a trusted remedy in Chinese and Indian medicine for its healing powers. The rhizomes hold the power ~ large amounts of volatile oils with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial properties.

Although native to Southeast Asia, where they are most abundant, ginger plants can be found throughout the tropics. In Chinese medicine ginger has been an effective remedy for soothing digestive disorders and nausea. On long voyages, Chinese navigators grew ginger in boxes on ships for their food, beverages and for seasickness. It’s a natural to prompt production of digestive enzymes that neutralize stomach acids. I’ve known many a sailor who wouldn’t leave port without their cache of ginger. It works!

I can’t imagine cooking without ginger in its various forms. Yet, prior to the Great Spice Race, Europeans had never tasted this gem. Ginger was one of the earliest spices carried by traders into the Mediterranean area. By the 11th century it was well known in England. Though not fresh ginger. Due to long journeys by ship and caravan, ginger was carried in its dried form either whole or powdered. It took advances in refrigeration for the rest of the world to experience fresh ginger. Today, ginger is grown in Jamaica, India, Fiji, Indonesia and Australia and used throughout the world in every culture.

Hard to mistake ginger rhizomes for anything else with their bulbous joints and small knobby bumps. Ginger’s ivory to pale yellow/green flesh is covered with a light brown corky layer. According to Jack Turner in his book, Spice, it has been cultivated for so long it can’t be found in a wild state. Plants no longer go to seed and must be propagated manually with root-stalk cuttings.

The whole family of perennial plants is known for being aromatic with attractive flowers. So they’re often used for landscaping. The flowers blossom along a dense, cone-like spike composed of overlapping green bracts. Each bract encloses a single, small yellow, green and purple flower.

Ginger’s aroma is pungent and sharp and has a peppery flavor with a hint of lemon. As a spice it’s used fresh, dried whole or powdered, pickled or crystallized. Historically it was added to food and beverages for its strong antibacterial qualities. Unique phytochemicals have healing qualities for digestive disorders, joint pain cold, fever, cough, nausea, poor circulation and respiratory illness. Truly, a gem.

Amazingly versatile, Ginger adds either a savory or sweet boost to almost everything from appetizers and beverages, including beer, to main dishes to desserts. Most recipes call for minced, sliced, grated or crushed ginger. In Japan, slices of ginger are eaten between meals to clear the palate.

It’s a common ingredient in many Indian dishes especially curries and soups. Add a couple teaspoons to your soup or stew or a few slices to stir-fried vegetables. Works wonders.

Put some zing in hot breakfast cereals or rice dishes made with coconut milk. Try it sliced or grated in your omelet. Also in chutneys and pickled vegetables. Gingered carrots and daikon radish ~ a favorite of mine. A few slices of baby ginger can be added to any salad but not a mature root as it’ll be too hot.

When the temperature drops in winter there’s nothing as warming as a cup of hot lemon ginger tea and a teaspoon of honey. And in summer months it makes a great cold drink in teas, smoothies or ginger water with a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar. Refreshing.

In it’s dried, candied or powdered form ginger adds a spicy sweetness to desserts ~ cakes, puddings, ice cream, cookies. Ever tasted chunks of ginger covered in dark chocolate? Yum.

All forms of ginger are best stored in airtight containers. Fresh rhizomes keep well in the vegetable drawer of the refrigerator.

There’s an old Italian rule for a happy life in old age: eat ginger, and you will love and be loved as in your youth!

_______________________________________________________________

Sero Seeds at RFC! 

We are excited to now carry Sero Seeds…local, organic and biodynamic! Our display rack can be found at the front of the store. We are happy to offer these seeds at below market price: $3.30 for members and $3.65 for non-members. Visit Sero Seeds for more info.

Upcoming Presentations

Co-op presentations have been popular events where co-op members and customers have free access to excellent information. Be sure to check out upcoming events in May (open to the public):

 

The Basics of Canning

Saturday, May 9, 3:00 PM

CanningCanning allows you to enjoy fresh local fruits and vegetables year round. It is a great way to support local farms…buying bulk produce when it is in season and canning it for long-term storage and use.

Join our General Manager, Jen Nelson, to learn about the basics of canning, using the water bath method. Jen will show some of the techniques for canning jams using a pectin that does not require sugar. She will talk about how to make marinara, relish, pears, apple, pear butter, and more!

 

Clean Your House Naturally!

Saturday, May 28, 3:00 PM

Natural Cleaners

Making natural cleaners at home not only saves you money but is better for our environment. We are commonly exposed to toxins on a daily basis from many of the cleaners that are on the market. The cleaners that you make at can be used on a regular basis without exposing ourselves, our loved ones or pets to toxic chemicals.

Join member Frances Klippel as she teach us how to make natural cleaners at home with common household items. They are easy to make using vinegars, essential oils, and other basic items. Frances also will talk about using soap nuts for cleaning and laundry. What is a soap nut you ask? Come on by and find out!

Get Involved!

There are many ways to get involved in the co-op…attend an event, volunteer, or support our community:


Rhody Days posterRhody Days Parade May 17: 
Calling all co-op kids

(and adults, too)! Help us educate our community about Real Food Co-op by marching or riding in the Rhody Days Parade. There should be a truck for those who cannot walk and kids can ride their bikes if they like (you have to be committed to ride the whole time)!  We will be passing out honey sticks. Email Jen for info.

School Garden Project: Thank you to all who voted for school garden in the grant contest. Unfortunately, we did not win a grant to enlarge the school garden, but we are still committed to helping with this important teaching tool. We are looking for donations of veggie starts and for people willing to help out regularly in the classroom or at work parties that support the garden. Email Jen for info.

 

GreenfairGreen Fair, Saturday, May 2: We are looking for members who want to donate a couple of hours at our booth to share information about the co-op with the community. Email Jen for more information.

 

Wednesday, May 27, 6:00 PM, Siuslaw Public Library Conference Room: Board of Directors Meeting. All members are invited and encouraged to attend.

 

Store-front Garden: We are looking for a person or people who would like to create a demonstration food-production garden in our store-front plot. It wouldn’t take much time and it would be a great way to demonstrate to our community how easy it is to grow food in Florence. Email Jen for info.

 

NextStep RecyclingRecycling, May 23-30:NextStep Recycling will again bring a donation bin to place at the store. More information will be sent out via email and on Facebook closer to the event.

Ginger Recipes

At the store right now…

Locally we are getting kale, chard, collards, leeks, nettle, chickweed, fava beans, NZ spinach and lettuce. Fiddleheads and miners lettuce are almost done.

We still have frozen strawberries and raspberries from Whiskey Creek.

Beets, cilantro, root vegetables, parsley, and a few other things are coming from the Willamette Valley.

Check the produce price list to see what is grown regionally!

Needs for the Store!

Contact Jen if you are able and interested in helping with any of the following. Members who help will earn store discounts!

We are looking for volunteers with grant-writing experience who can help us apply for grants.

We are in need of a cake plate with glass dome top that can be used for putting out samples (and keeping them covered with a see-through lid).

Needed: Black Sharpies for the store.

Looking for members who are willing to pick up items in Eugene and deliver them to our store. This will help reduce our delivery costs.

This and That

This section includes newsworthy items and information that may interest members.

Ductless Heat Pump: You may notice that the store feels cool! Thanks to our new Ductless Heat Pump. With this new system the store will stay at a nice cool temperature which will provide a wonderful shopping experience and preserve our food. Please remember to leave the doors and windows closed to conserve electricity.

Locally Grown MagazineWe now have copies of theLocally Grown Guide fromWillamette Farm and Food Coalition available at the storeThis publication lists local farms and producers.

Posted in About Co-op, Co-op Newsletter and Weekly Articles, Community/Member Support, Event Calendar, Info for Volunteers, Jen's Corner, News from the Co-op, Recipes, recycling, Special Interest | Leave a comment

   CALLING ALL CO-OP MEMBERS AND SUPPORTERS!

0aad8deb-27c8-4b9e-b62c-898a09a17dda

 

             Help us make a difference in our community.                   

Seeds of Change Grant Opportunity

We have a wonderful opportunity to win a large grant to help expand our school garden project, but we need your help…all you need to do is VOTE each day and share this with your friends so they can vote, too!  Here’s the scoop… Seeds of Change®, leading producer of certified organic seeds and foods, is hosting its fourth annual Grant Program.  REAL FOOD CO-OP has submitted an application to receive a $20,000, $10,000 or $1,000 grant to fund our local SCHOOL GARDEN.  To help us support our sustainable gardening initiative, please visit Seeds of Change®  to vote EACH DAY for REAL FOOD CO-OP between April 9 and April 27 (vote once each day).

There are two ways to vote:

1. Facebook-   www.facebook.com/seedsofchange

2. Website-     www.seedsofchangegrant.com

Once voting closes, the 50 organizations with the most votes will move on to the final judging phase and recipients will be announced around May 12.    

Please VOTE & SHARE!                  

Real Food Co-op

1379 B Rhododendron Dr. Florence, OR 97439

(541) 997-3396

 realfoodcoop2@gmail.com

Posted in About Co-op, Board News, Community/Member Support, Jen's Corner, News from the Co-op, Special Interest, Upcoming Events | Leave a comment

Organic Bytes

Posted in GMO FOOD, Health Issues, Monsanto, Organic Bytes, Organic products, Sustainable Farming | Leave a comment

April Co-op News

Happy Spring to all…..

We’re spicing things up this month with a few great articles about…just that… spices! Learn about the history of spices and about the “Golden Spice,” Turmeric.

And we have a number of exciting announcements  in this month’s newsletter, including two “Wild Edibles” events! We hope to see you there.

The sun is making more appearances and the garden is calling. I’ve noticed my Kohlrabi and Broccoli starts are taking off .

May your garden be bountiful this year!

Sincerely,

Jen

 Real Food Co-op           541-997-3396

________________________________________________________________

 

Wild Edibles: You Want Me To Eat That?

       Saturday, April 11, 1:00 to 2:00 PM, at RFC.

Join Kelsey, from Homegrown Pub, and Jen, from Real Food Co-op, to learn more about identifying and preparing wild edibles that grow in our area. You will learn how to identify and prepare stinging nettles into a soup or a pesto and how to identify miners lettuce, chickweed, wood violets, fiddleheads, sea beans and more.

Follow up this event by attending…

 

Spring Celebration

Celebrate Locally Grown Foods @ Homegrown

Monday, April 13
Appetizers 5:30 PM, Dinner 6:00 PM

Join us for this fun and delicious dinner prepared by Kelsey at Homegrown Pub. For our meal we will be focusing on wild spring edibles such as nettles, sea beans, miners lettuce, chickweed, and other fun foods.

Our menu will include smoked tofu and chicken, wild greens salad, picked fiddlehead salad, sea beans, and a strawberry surprise for dessert!

Tickets are $20 for adults and free for kids 12 and under (sponsored by RFC and Homegrown/advance purchase at RFC or Homegrown).

Dessert Auction: Proceeds support our School Garden Project and Kids Garden Activities.

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Join us to support locally grown food, our kids, and our community!

Sero Seeds at RFC! 

We are super excited to now carry Sero Seeds…local, organic and biodynamic! Our display rack can be found at the front of the store. We are happy to offer these seeds at below market price: $3.30 for members and $3.65 for non-members. Visit Sero Seeds for more info.

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Feed the Need ~ A Community-Wide Event to Support

Florence Food Share

We are partnering with Florence Food Share between April 1 and 30 to provide healthy organic food to those in need. You can help! Bring dry food to our store to place in the Feed the Need barrel.

Some of the most-needed items include: Flour, sugar, peanut butter, canned meats (such as tuna or chicken), canned tomato products, baby formula, and baby food.

Additionally, if you are interested in sharing the cost of bulk beans, grains, etc., email Jen so we can consolidate our efforts.

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Local Spring Greens are Here!

Chickweed is a yummy wild green that is easy to cultivate in your garden. It is known to be nutritious and a mild blood cleanser. Chop it up and put it in your salad.

Corn salad or mache, commonly used in Europe, is known for its nutty flavor. It grows well in cool climates and is great in salads!

Stinging nettle grows wild in moist areas. It is high in vitamins and minerals and has many health benefits. It can be used in soups, stir fry, lasagna, smoothies (raw), or teas.

Not sure how to get nettles out of the bag without getting stung? First, dump out the bag. The stingers are on the bottom of the leaf, so pick up the plant by the bottom of the stem and use scissors to cut at the base of the leaf, leaving the young stem to eat. Then use scissors to cut up the nettle and tongs to throw it in the pan. If you do get stung, put aloe (the slime from the middle of the leaf), or plantain on the affected area. 

Fiddleheads are locally wildcrafted from the ostrich fern. They are high in omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, iron, and fiber. They have some antioxidants available as well. Enjoy them sauteed with other veggies or eggs, or steamed. They are great with butter, lemon, or vinegar.   Kelsey, at homegrown pub, suggests cooking fiddleheads until light green and then finish the dish. Enjoy!

Miner’s lettuce grows wild locally in our forests, near creek beds, etc…the leaves and flowers are edible. Enjoy miner’s lettuce in salads or lightly steamed.

At the store right now…

Some of your favorites that are available at the store right now:

  • Kale…….lots of varieties
  • Collards
  • Chard
  • Kale tops or rabe tops
  • Nettle
  • Chickweed
  • Miner’s lettuce
  • Leeks
  • Beets
  • Asparagus
  • New Zealand spinach
  • Mustard greens
  • Frozen strawberries from Whiskey Creek

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Dairy Culture: Making Yogurt and Kefir at Home

Saturday, April 25, 3:00 – 4:00 PM @ RFC

 Join Rene and Calvin to learn how to make yogurt and kefir at home! They will discuss counter-top yogurts and ones you make in a machine. You also will learn how to make a yogurt-maker at home!

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          What’s the difference between an herb and a spice?

According to Susan Smith Jones, Ph.D., in an article, The Healing Remedies in Spices: “Herbs are typically the leaves of plants, spices originate from a plant’s aromatic parts, including the root, bark, flower, berry and seed. Herbs are their most potent and flavorful when fresh, but most spices gain their flavor and healing properties in the drying process, when naturally occurring enzymes are activated.”

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We thought you might enjoy some recipes that will allow you to use some of the wonderful spices available at the Real Food Co-op…

7 Ways to Eat (& Drink) Turmeric

Cumin and Coriander: 7 Indian Dishes to Try at Home

Cinnamon Creations

Ginger and More Ginger

Nom Nom Nutmeg

Want to try something different?

Visit thekitchn.com (sic) and type your favorite spice in the search box.

 

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Roots & Shoots 

 elsan

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The Life of Spice

Spices tell a fascinating story that began thousands of years ago. An alluring story saturated with exotic aromas and flavors. Today, with spices so easily and readily available it’s a story and value we take for granted.

From earliest times people have nurtured a powerful attraction for spices. Spices were rare and precious products. Specific origins were guarded secrets known only by spice merchants who created mystery as well as high prices by telling fantastic tales of their journeys to reach and procure spices.

An Assyrian myth tells of the first reference to a spice ~ sesame seed. Gods drank sesame wine the night before creating the earth. Artwork and writing of early civilizations refer to the use of spices and herbs. Hieroglyphs in the Great Pyramid at Giza depict workers eating garlic and onions for strength.

Among gifts in tribute to King Solomon, the Queen of Sheba included spices. Olympians celebrating victory wore wreaths of bay and parsley. Remember Hippocrates? He created and recorded over 400 medicinal remedies with spices and herbs. About half of them remain in use today.

Spice Trade Route

A handful of Asian spices began the epic spice race that led to immense wealth, empires and new world discoveries. In its day the spice trade was the world’s greatest industry. Arabic spice merchants with camel caravans first controlled the trade routes. Then Romans commanded the spice trade bringing pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and ginger for the enjoyment of upper class Romans and established a trading center in Alexandria, Egypt. Demand and use of spices grew expanding world trade. Over centuries various countries and groups battled for control of the spice trade. By the mid-13th century, Venice had become the primary trade port for spices.

In a fascinating book, Spice, Jack Turner, writes about the influence and subsequent quest for spices. The further they traveled from their origins, the more interesting they became, the greater the passions they aroused, the higher their value, the more outlandish the properties credited to them. What was special in Asia was astonishing in Europe. In the European imagination there never was, and perhaps never again will be, anything quite like them. Spices may no longer possess such grand powers yet their attraction and mystery continue.

Two major Asian spices with powerful attraction that eventually spanned the globe are ginger and turmeric. Both belong to the same family, Zingiberaceae. Aptly named as both have a zing! Both spices are made from their roots and are aromatic. Both are used in foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. Both possess medicinal qualities and were used in Ayurvedic tradition for thousands of years to treat digestive disorders, joint pain, nausea, circulation problems, vertigo and more. Both are warming spices improving circulation.

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Look to Your Roots 

 elsan

Turmeric…the Golden Spice

If vibrant color measured a spice’s worth then turmeric would top the list. Used for thousands of years in China, India and Indonesia, this vibrant spice boasts a lengthy list of fascinating uses. A culinary spice, healing remedy, textile dye, food coloring and body coloring to name a few. In religious ceremonies turmeric represents life, purity and prosperity.

Turmeric plays a key role in Indian Ayurvedic herbal medicine. As well as being recognized as a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory it is one of the strongest antiseptics known. In Ayurveda medicine, turmeric is known as strengthening and warming the whole body.

In Indian culture, the importance of turmeric goes far beyond medicine. In the Hindu religion turmeric is auspicious and sacred. In India and Malaysia, there is a custom of making turmeric paste to apply directly onto the skin, a practice currently being studied as a preventative measure against skin cancer. The bright red forehead mark worn by some Hindu women can be made by mixing turmeric with lime juice.

Turmeric is made from Curcuma longa, a plant that grows to about three feet and produces both a flower and rhizome. Like ginger, the spice is derived from the rhizome or root of the plant. Peel away the rough brown skin for the deep orange flesh, characteristic of turmeric. The bouquet is earthy and slightly acrid with a peppery, warm flavor and bitter undertone. Turmeric is typically ground into a bright orange powder but can be used fresh.

Early western herbalists showed little interest in turmeric but a group of chemists about 1870 discovered a fascinating and useful quality. Turmeric’s orange-yellow root powder turned reddish brown with exposure to alkaline chemicals. Hence, turmeric paper for alkalinity. Sometime in the mid-20th century, German herbalists noted turmeric’s potential remedy for the digestive system. Yet it wasn’t until the 1990s that turmeric’s benefits and usefulness were appreciated in the west. Prominent herbalists of the time began promoting turmeric as a remedy for health issues. As one herbalist, Michael Castleman declared, Western herbalists, wake up. Turmeric is a healer.

Turmeric’s special healing compound is curcumin. It’s the ingredient that gives turmeric its vibrant color. It’s the ingredient believed to be a powerful antioxidant with a host of beneficial effects on the body. A powerful compound for preventing and treating inflammation with negligible side effects. Curcumin is found only in turmeric. Curcumin is not related to cumin, which is a spice made from the seed of a different plant.

Ongoing research studies are examining the medicinal properties and beneficial effects of curcumin. Articles abound in health and nutrition magazines about the healing qualities of curcumin as well as current studies.

Turmeric is eaten both cooked and raw throughout Asia. It’s less fibrous than ginger and more chewable and crunchy. Though sometimes chewed or chopped up in salads in its raw state turmeric is most often mashed or ground to make a paste and mixed with other spices for curries. After all, turmeric gives Indian curries their rich flavor and deep yellow-orange color. Curry powders contain less curcumin than turmeric. So, if you want the most curcumin be sure to add turmeric when cooking Indian dishes.

Selecting fresh turmeric

Try to select organically grown turmeric to ensure the rhizomes have not been irradiated. Color is not necessarily a mark of quality as the color varies with different varieties. Keep fresh turmeric in the refrigerator and turmeric powder in a tightly sealed container in a cool, dark and dry place. To make your own turmeric powder boil, dry and grind fresh rhizomes.

Be forewarned ~ turmeric’s color will stain hands, countertops and chopping boards. Wash immediately. Don’t want yellow-stained hands? Try wearing gloves.

Note: As with any potent spice or herb, if you’re being treated for a major medical issue be sure to discuss with your physician before using turmeric and especially turmeric supplements. Food is medicine. Medicine is food.

 Turmeric in the kitchen

 Grown in Bengal, China, Taiwan, Sri Lanka, Java, Peru, Australia and the West Indies turmeric is added to mustard and can be used to color foods like butter, margarine and cheese. And don’t forget pickles, relishes and chutneys.

Curcumin is extremely sensitive to light, moisture and heat. In cooking it’s best to add at the end of heating a dish. Since it can be stabilized with acids turmeric is used in salad dressings and tomato recipes. Too, you can add a little vinegar or lemon juice to stabilize the curcumin.

Ideas for using turmeric

  • Add to egg salad or deviled eggs for a bolder color
  • Wonderful with rice dishes along with currants, cashews, coriander
  • Adding turmeric in addition to curry enhances Indian dishes
  • Sprinkle on sautéed apples, steamed cauliflower, green salads
  • Add to bean dishes, dips or mayonnaise
  • Compliments lentil dishes
  • Try turmeric tea
  • Seasoning for soups
  • Blend in a smoothie
  • Use a pinch in scrambled eggs, frittatas
  • Toss with roasted veggies after roasting
  • Blend with butter, ghee or olive oil and drizzle over cooked veggies, pasta or potatoes
  •  Include in a marinade

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Get Involved!

There are many ways to get involved in the co-op…attend an event, volunteer, or support our community:

Call to Artists: We are looking for art and craft donations for a fundraiser for the co-op. The benefit will be held on June 27 at the Kenneth B Gallery. All pieces need to be received by June 20. If you are interested in donating, would like to help with the event, or have questions, please contact Community Outreach & Fundraising coordinator, Christine Delgado, via email or phone: 206-369-6825.

Protect the Florence Aquifer: Educate yourself our about water issues in Florence. We have some info and petitions for you to sign at the co-op. Email Protect Florence Aquifer to get on the mailing list for updates about chemical spraying that is happening within our Clear Lake Watershed (which feeds into our water source).

Rhody Days Parade May 17: We are looking for adults and kids that would like to help us make a presence during the Rhody Days Parade. This is a great opportunity for us to be involved in the community and educate folks that we are here. Email Jen for info.

Dessert Auction Donations – to benefit the School Garden Project: We are looking for people who would like to donate a dessert for our Dessert Auction to be held at the Spring Celebration on April 13. Proceeds benefit the School Garden Project. Email Jen to let her know what amazing dessert you would like to donate!

School Garden Project: Help with the school garden, either as a classroom volunteer or at work parties. Or, donate garden tools at the store. Email Jen for info.

Cloth Bag Drive: Help us celebrate Earth Day on April 22. Bring in clean cloth bags to donate for reuse. Help reduce the amount of paper and plastic that we are putting in the waste stream.

Green Fair, Saturday, May 2: We are looking for members who want to donate a couple of hours at our booth to share information about the co-op with our community. Email Jen for more information.

Florence Household Hazardous Waste Round-up: Friday, April 10, 12:00 to 5:00, and Saturday, April 11, 8:00 to 2:00 at the Florence Transfer Station. For info, call 997-8237.

More Opportunities

  • The Board is looking for folks interested in being involved with work groups to help our co-op continue to grow and be successful.
  • The Store Operations Committee is focusing on the internal working of the store. They are working on new member info, product display, maintenance, and other things.
  • The In-Store Education Committee provides education about our products to our customers.
  • The Community Outreach & Fundraising Committee is creating fun events for our co-op and Florence community to raise awareness about what the co-op is doing, and to raise funds to support our store.

Committees are a great way to help with a specific project if you can’t help at the store on a regular basis as well as to support your co-op while earning a working member discount.

Email the store to let us know how you would like to participate!

Thanks for helping!

Thanks to the following volunteers for helping with our quarterly inventory in March: Pat, Bob, Frank, Mary, Rene, Ian and Calvin!  We appreciate your help!

We would like to extend our thanks to all of our volunteers who worked hard this past month to keep our store running smoothly:

  • Carol Barbee
  • Randy Curtola
  • Pip Cole
  • Rene & Ian Dobbins
  • Christine Delgado
  • Virgil Gentry
  • Valerie Gordon
  • Sara Kaul
  • Judy Kinsman
  • Frances Klippel
  • Susan Kirby
  • Michele Le Blanc
  • Pat Mills
  • Anna Moore
  • Tom O’Ryan
  • Dina Pavlis
  • Lori Robertson
  • Bob Spillman
  • Mindy Stone
  • Art Trujillo
  • Elsan Zimmerly
  • Joann Henderson

If we missed your name, please accept our apology and let us know so we can be sure to include you next month. Thank you!

 

About the Real Food Co-op

   1379 B Rhododendron   Florence, Oregon 97439

(541) 997-3396

Email: realfoodcoop2@gmail.com

Hours:

Mon-Sat: 10:00 to 6:00

Sun: Closed

General Manager

Jen Nelson

Assistant Manager

Calvin Steventon

Working Member Coordinator

Laurie Stone

Board of Directors

  • Erin Leonard, President
  • Christine Delgado
  • Pat Mills
  • Bob Spillman
  • Laurie Stone
  • Carol Sweet

We think our monthly newsletter is wonderful and we enjoy bringing it to you each month. There are limitations, however, in getting timely information to you in this format. Be sure to Like us on Facebook to receive current information about arrivals, sales and events on a daily/weekly basis. Thank you for supporting Real Food Co-op!

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